Muir Beach Volunteer Fire Department
Muir Beach Volunteer Fire Department

 

MBVFD is 100% volunteer. That means ALL donations
go DIRECTLY towards keeping our volunteer firefighers well trained and equipped. Thanks for your support.

9-1-1 calls from cell phones within the Muir Beach area are connected to a dispatch operator in the Central Valley who has no idea where Muir Beach is!

The number to call when using your cell phone for an incident in the Muir Beach area is 415-472-0911.

 

Safety Tips

Hiking Safety

Hiking SafetyRules for Safe Hiking near Muir Beach
Hiking Gear Checklist
Hiking with Kids
Hiking with your Dog
Critters to Avoid
Poison Oak - Those Pretty Shiny Leaves
Ticks & Lyme Disease

 

 


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Rules for Safe Hiking near Muir Beach

Basic Rules for Hiking:

Download Marin SAR's safety brochure (PDF)


Getting Lost
It is surprisingly easy to get lost, especially when hiking. There are four major reasons for this: there are lots of deer trails, a few trails are overgrown, some junctions lack signs, and people take short-cuts. The easiest places to get lost are around Mt. Tam, especially the north side. If you are in a new area, our advice is to follow the hike carefully and note each junction on the map. You might even want to use a stopwatch and reset it at each junction. That way, you can tell roughly how far you've come since the last junction. Above all, stay on trails and don't take shortcuts.
Marin Trails
www.hikingdude.com/hiking-lost.php
www.nearfieldcommunicationtags.com/hiking-safety.html

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Hiking Gear Checklist

Recommended Hiking Equipment:

A common incident in Marin is an Unexpected Night Out where the individual or group does not anticipate night fall or rapid change in weather and temperature such as late afternoon fog. Properly used, the following items will give you warmth, shelter, and energy for an Unexpected Night Out:

* Trail maps can be obtained at the Ranger Station or a local outdoor shop.
Hiking checklist from Marin Search & Rescue brochure
www.marinsar.org
Download Marin SAR's safety brochure (PDF)


The California Department of Parks & Recreation has more advice for hiking safety:

The California Department of Parks & Recreation
www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=24051

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Hiking with Kids

Fun, family-friendly hikes to take
www.plumsite.com/bayareamoms/outandabout/naturetrails/trails.htm


Tips for hiking with kids: Great advice from a mother of three with experience in taking children on the trails.
Bay Area Hiker: www.bahiker.com/kids.html
www.plumsite.com/bayareamoms/

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Hiking with your Dog

Dogs need exercise, just like people do. Here are some tips on exercising with your pet.

Adapted from: Animal Rescue


Here is some general information about where to hike with dogs in Marin County. Note: Be sure to bring water for your dog, especially in summer and fall.
www.trails.com/activity.aspx?area=15275
www.bahiker.com/doghikes.html 
http://blogs.kqed.org/guides/2012/09/best-dog-friendly-hikes-around-the-bay/
www.nps.gov/goga/parkmgmt/pets.htm
Oakwood Valley / Alta Trail Map (PDF)

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Critters to Avoid

What you should know about mountain lions, coyotes, bobcats & snakes when hiking on Mt. Tam
Bay Area Hiker
www.bahiker.com/plantpages/troubleplants.html


Mountain Lions
Mountain lions are an important part of park ecosystem, helping to keep deer and other prey populations in check. Although lion attacks are rare, they are possible, as is injury from any wild animal. We offer the following recommendations to increase your safety: Do not leave pets or pet food outside and unattended, especially at dawn and dusk. Pets can attract mountain lions into developed areas. Avoid walking alone. Watch children closely and never let them run ahead or lag behind on the trail. Talk to children about lions and teach them what to do if they meet one.

What should you do if you meet a mountain lion?

Generally, mountain lions are calm, quiet, and elusive. The chance of being attacked by a mountain lion is quite low compared to many other natural hazards. There is, for example, a far greater risk of being struck by lightning than being attacked by a mountain lion.
Adapted from: National Park Service website

More about mountain lions
http://wdfw.wa.gov/living/cougars.html


Bobcats
People often mistake a bobcat for a mountain lion. See what they look like, learn about how they hunt, and what about baby bobcats?
http://wdfw.wa.gov/living/bobcats.html


Coyotes
Coyotes are a native species and a critical component of the ecosystem. While far from domesticated, coyotes show little fear of humans and have become comfortable living in close proximity to our communities. Although they tend to do most of their hunting after dusk, the so-called "prairie wolf" can be active at any time. Under normal circumstance, coyotes are not dangerous to humans. They are, however, territorial and will respond aggressively if they or their family are threatened. It's also worth noting that it's hard for a coyote to pass up a free meal or, as the case may be, a defenseless pet. This applies even if it requires leaping fences (as high as 6 feet) or overcoming other obstacles for the opportunity.

To date, there have been very few attacks on pets or humans. Nevertheless, caution is always warranted, and with that in mind, experts recommend the following steps:

Adapted from: Newport Bay Naturalists & Friends

More about lliving with coyotes
http://wdfw.wa.gov/living/coyotes.html

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Poison Oak - Those Pretty Shiny Leaves

poison oakPoison oak is a common plant throughout much of California. Learn to identify its shiny, three-leaf pattern and avoid touching it. If you touch poison oak, wash immediately with water and mild soap. Pat dry with a clean towel.


More about poison oak & star thistle
Bay Area Hiker
www.bahiker.com/plantpages/troubleplants.html


Poison oak symptoms, how contagious it is, treatment & prevention
WebMD
www.webmd.com/allergies/guide/poison-ivy-oak-sumac


Outsmarting Poison Oak & Its Cousins
U.S. Food & Drug Administration
www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm049342.htm

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Ticks & Lyme Disease

Learn about Lyme disease: Centers for Disease Control (CDC): Lyme Disease
www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/lyme/index.htm


Family Doctor.org: Lyme Disease
http://familydoctor.org/familydoctor/en/diseases-conditions/lyme-disease.html


Mayo Clinic: Lyme Disease
www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/lyme-disease/basics/definition/con-20019701

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