Muir Beach Volunteer Fire Department
Muir Beach Volunteer Fire Department

 

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Watch our new Video on safe techniques for fire extinguisher use.
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MBVFD is 100% volunteer. That means ALL donations
go DIRECTLY towards keeping our volunteer firefighers well trained and equipped. Thanks for your support.

 

9-1-1 calls from cell phones within the Muir Beach area are connected to a dispatch operator in the Central Valley who has no idea where Muir Beach is!

The number to call when using your cell phone for an incident in the Muir Beach area is 415-472-0911.

 

 

 

 

Safety Tips

Fire Safety

Fire SafetyWildland Fires - Making a Defensible Space Around Your Home
What To Do If There's a Chimney Fire
Cooking Fires
Escape Planning - Get out Safely!
Home Fire Prevention
Bedroom Fire Safety
Hotspots: Wood Stoves, Space Heaters, Kerosene Heaters & Fireplaces
Make Your Fireplace Safe
What You Need to Know About Smoke Alarms
After a Fire
Just for Kids!


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Wildland Fires - Making a Defensible Space Around your Home

Defensible Space is the base around our homes that will give firefighters a fighting chance against fire. Find out more:
www.firesafemarin.org/defensible.htm


We need to become aware of the level of fire hazard where we live. Hazards are rated as extreme, high, or moderate. The higher the hazard, the greater the risk to our houses and the more we need to do to ensure survival from an approaching wildfire.
Visit Fire Safe Marin to Find out what to do.
Download a Defensible Space Checklist (PDF)


Wildfires often begin unnoticed, then spread quickly, igniting brush, trees, and homes. We can reduce our risk by preparing now before wildfire strikes.
American Red Cross: Download PDF.

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What To Do If There's a Chimney Fire

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Cooking Fires

In 2002 alone, cooking-related fires caused an estimated 185,600 structure fires, 80 civilian deaths, 3,875 injuries, and $481 million in property damage, according to a new report issued today by the Federal Emergency Management Agency's U.S. Fire Administration. Here are some quick tips:

U.S. Fire Administration
Download the whole FEMA report.

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Escape Planning - Get out Safely!

More than 4,000 Americans die each year in fires, and approximately 20,000 are injured. Deaths resulting from failed emergency escapes are particularly avoidable.

The United States Fire Administration (USFA) believes that having a sound escape plan will greatly reduce fire deaths and protect you and your family's safety if a fire occurs.

HAVE A SOUND FIRE ESCAPE PLAN
In the event of a fire, remember - time is the biggest enemy and every second counts! Escape plans help you get out of your home quickly. In less than 30 seconds a small flame can get completely out of control and turn into a major fire. It only takes minutes for a house to fill with thick black smoke and become engulfed in flames.

U.S. Fire Administration
Download the details. (PDF)

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Home Fire Prevention

More than 4,000 Americans die each year in fires and approximately 20,000 are injured. An overwhelming number of fires occur in the home. There are time-tested ways to prevent and survive a fire. It's not a question of luck. It's a matter of planning ahead.

U.S. Fire Administration
Download the details. (PDF)

 

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Bedroom Fire Safety

Each year, fire claims the lives of 4,000 Americans and injures approximately 20,000. Bedrooms are a common area of fire origin. Nearly 600 lives are lost to fires that start in bedrooms. Many of these fires are caused by misuse or poor maintenance of electrical devices, such as overloading extension cords or using portable space heaters too close to combustibles. Many other bedroom fires are caused by children who play with matches and lighters, careless smoking among adults, and arson.

The United States Fire Administration (USFA) and the Sleep Products Safety Council (SPSC) would like you to know that there are simple steps you can take to prevent the loss of life and property resulting from bedroom fires.

U.S. Fire Administration
Download the details. (PDF)

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Hotspots: Wood Stoves, Space Heaters, Kerosene Heaters & Fireplaces

Each year fire claims the lives of 4,000 Americans, injures 20,000, and causes billions of dollars worth of damage. People living in rural areas are more than twice as likely to die in a fire than those living in mid-sized cities or suburban areas. The misuse of wood stoves, portable space heaters and kerosene heaters are especially common risks in rural areas.
Check Your Home's Hotspots (PDF)

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Make Your Fireplace Safe

More than one-third of Americans use fireplaces, wood stoves and other fuel-fired appliances as primary heat sources in their homes. Unfortunately, many people are unaware of the fire risks when heating with wood and solid fuels.

Heating fires account for 36% of residential home fires in rural areas every year. Often these fires are due to creosote buildup in chimneys and stovepipes. All home heating systems require regular maintenance to function safely and efficiently.

The United States Fire Administration (USFA) encourages you to practice the following fire safety steps to keep those home fires safely burning. Remember, fire safety is your personal responsibility ...Fire Stops With You!

U.S. Fire Administration
Download the details. (PDF)

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What You Need to Know About Smoke Alarms

In the 1960's, the average U. S. citizen had never heard of a smoke alarm. By 1995, an estimated 93 percent of all American homes - single - and multi- family, apartments, nursing homes, dormitories, etc. - were equipped with alarms.

The impact of smoke alarms on fire safety and protection is dramatic and can be simply stated. When fire breaks out, the smoke alarm, functioning as an early warning system, reduces the risk of dying by nearly 50 percent. Alarms are most people's first line of defense against fire.

U.S. Fire Administration
Get the details: www.nfpa.org/research/reports-and-statistics/fire-safety-equipment/smoke-alarms-in-us-home-fires

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After a Fire

Recovering from a fire can be a physically and mentally draining process.

When fire strikes, lives are suddenly turned around. Often, the hardest part is knowing where to begin and who to contact.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA) United States Fire Administration (USFA) has gathered the following information to assist you in this time of need. Action on some of the suggestions will need to be taken immediately. Some actions may be needed in the future while others will be on going. The purpose of this information is to assist you as you begin rebuilding your life.

U.S. Fire Administration
Get the details: www.usfa.fema.gov/prevention/outreach/after_fire.html

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Just for Kids!

Here are links to websites that teach kids about fire safety through interactive games, coloring books, and other activities.

Tools and resources that come from trusted organizations and are free to use in your home or classroom.
www.areavibes.com/library/fire-safety-for-kids/

Smokey Bear website: Educational games, activities. & information about fire safety.
www.smokeybear.com/


Sparky the Fire Dog: Games & Activities, interactive chat – ask Sparky questions.
www.sparky.org/

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